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Amazing Adventures of Larry and Mark part 11

 

Early American map-makers believed that there was a way to sail from the northern Atlantic west  and come out in the Pacific.

The famous "northwest passage" has been sought by sailors for 130 years. Please pardon poor quality of these images.

These photos were taken from wall posters.

The expeditions were with crude equipment in ships only under sail power, and many were frozen for winters in the ice.

John Ross, from 1829-1833, was "trapped in the ice for four years."  Some ships were never found.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roald Amundsen finally took his ship the Gjoa through the Northwest Passage in 1903. 

He would be back several more times.

 

 

 

 

 The Cambridge Bay Church was built across the inlet from Cambridge Bay in the early 1950's.  Its mortar had seal oil in it. 

Years ago, some young persons burned it down, and it was never rebuilt. 

 

 

 

 

 When I first saw the ruins of the church,  it reminded me of the Old Stone Church in West Boylston,  which, until the

renovation about 30 years ago, was in a rapid state of deterioration and would have looked like the Cambridge Bay Church

if the restoration project hadn't been done.  I tried to find a photo of the Old Stone Church before its renovation, but  I

couldn't find one.  So here is my photo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Father Steinman's boat.  And us.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The area which would be known as Cambridge Bay was visited by the Inuit for hundreds of years.  The

Hudson's Bay Company helped found the town by establishing a floating trading post in the bay in 1927. The

post consisted of one of Roald Amundsen old ships, the Maud. Amundsen, the first to navigate the Northwest

Passage, had tried to freeze the Maud into the Arctic ice so he could drift over the North Pole. But after failing

several times he wasn't able to pay his debts, and the ship was eventually seized and sold to the HBC. Renamed the

Baymaud, the ship became a floating trading post, but then sank in the shallow waters of Cambridge Bay a few

years after it arrived. Well preserved by the cold Arctic waters, the ship remains a strange sight for visitors and a

curious memento of Arctic exploration.

 

 

Still More to Come!

 

Larry Reich

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