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The Amazing New Adventures of Larry and Mark - Peru, Land of the Incas

Chapter 5 

The Streets of Cusco

We are still walking Cusco

 

At the time we were in the Plaza, the police must have been anticipating a riot or something.

They were all standing with their plastic shields.  I snapped a quick picture unobtrusively,

but I don't think they would have been friendly if they saw me. 

 

But minutes later, they were packing up and putting their equipment

 into mini cars and leaving the area.

 

 

Willow gives us our first view of the Inca construction, which will continue to amaze us. 

These stones have been here maybe 600 years, with no mortar to hold them in place.  

 

 

 

This is the first floor of a building on  the main square - Plaza de Armas - and, like much of old

Cusco, is built on the Inca foundations which the Spaniards realized they could not improve on.

 

 

Balcony is typical Cusqeño style 

 

 

So many of the streets in Cusco were planned only for human and llama travel, like this one. 

 

 

Everywhere, we marvel at the mortar-free construction.  I wish I could imagine

what is going on inside the head of the 13th Century architect who is setting a

stone in place, and then planning the next one. 

 

 

 

This is known as the "12-angled stone."  I'm sure we could do this with lasers, and

computer-driven grinders, but how the hell was it done back then?  Some people say

it was LGM's.  That's "Little Green Men from spaceships."   This Inca wall with the

twelve-angled stone serves as a symbol of Cusco and is the logo for Cusquena beer.

 

 

This photo gives some hints to aids in placing the stones. Many stones have knobs on

them which must have been used to help hold the stones during transportation and setting. 

 

 

We pause on a street overlooking the hills of Cusco.  The weather is cool - 60's,

which make it easier to keep fully covered against the strong sunlight at this altitude. 

 

 

Many motifs are seen carved into the Inca stones.  In this case, a snake.

 

 If you had to spend your whole day selling these colored ribbons of cloth,

you'd take a siesta once in a while too!

 

 

Much more to come

 

You may reach me for comments:

Laurence Reich

auburndocreich@aol.com

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